‘Is the tape part of the work?’

Grand plans, that’s what I had.  It was going to be the first of a series of works on wooden board and I already knew what I wanted to do.  But then came the suggestion ‘Is the tape part of the work?’
Gosh.  No.  It’s not…. wait.

Ah, the eyes of other people!  They see other things.  I had taped the edge of the wood to protect it while I was working with it.  However, as the tape is a vibrant blue, it played off the colours I was working with on the board.

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Is the tape part of the work? (detail view)
Acrylic and low-tack painters tape on wooden board

 
(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Is the tape part of the work? (side view)
Acrylic and low-tack painters tape on wooden board

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Is the tape part of the work?
Acrylic and low-tack painters tape on wooden board

For the moment, it stays.  I think they were right.  It is part of the work.
Makes me giggle every time I see it though.

Work on Paper and Off Paper

Over the past couple of days, this work happened – or part of it. This is a 100cm x 45cm work on 300gsm watercolour paper.  Paper has a memory.  How I wish it would remember the time when it was flat, not when it was on a roll.  Makes it really hard to flatten out and paint on without marking the paper. 

This work is a bit of a new direction (not really) and definitely a work in progress – this is not the finished product!  Acrylic, gesso, watercolour, graphite, vinyl on paper – and off paper?  Vinyl and wool.  The plan was to extend out from the paper with vinyl onto the wall, and from the paper to the floor with wool.

I’m not sure if this is a step backward from my wall works, or an extension of the idea.  But, it’s something I’m willing to explore – let’s not overthink, shall we?  I just like the presence of some form of painting tradition sometimes (like the frame or substrate), then I can ‘do stuff’ to them.

Here it is installed, with the addition of some more vinyl and wool extending to the floor, anchored by more vinyl.  In comparison to recent work, this feels positively minuscule!  But, it’s an interesting exercise.  This is about 2m x 1.5m.  This straddles 2D and 3D, not merely a drawing and not completely an installation.  I think I’d like to see this in series.  Maybe 6 of them, along a wall.  Individual works, or perhaps linked by a common anchor point.

Dimensions of Space: Documentation

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Line Drawing Extrusion (Installation view)
Acrylic paint, vinyl, wool, nails
(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Line Drawing Extrusion (Installation view)
Acrylic paint, vinyl, wool, nails
(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Line Drawing Extrusion (Installation view)
Acrylic paint, vinyl, wool, nails

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Line Drawing Extrusion (Installation view)
Acrylic paint, vinyl, wool, nails
(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Line Drawing Extrusion (Installation view)
Acrylic paint, vinyl, wool, nails
(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Nebulous & Nebulous II (Installation view)
Oil on canvas

(c) 2012 Naomi Nicholls, Dimensions of Space (Exhibition Installation view)

These are some of the photographs from the Dimensions of Space exhibition.  It’s so hard to photograph a work that you walk into and around.  So I’ve captured lots of angles.  I’ve also taken some video footage which I will edit together in the next little while and post up here somewhere.

I’m really pleased with how the work has turned out. The negative space in the room is as important as the work itself – the places in the work that you can walk in to and think about yourself in relation to the work.  The lighting provides additional line drawings add extra punch to the wool ‘extrusions’.  Unfortunately, the yellow wool doesn’t show up very well in the photographs, but rest assured, there was plenty of it. 

‘Extrusion’ is such a nice word to describe what I wanted to do; pull apart a painting so we could walk in.  To extruuuuuuuude the lines and shapes so we could enter.